The Toronto Police Services is here to provide assistance and support. For further information on the community support resources available to you, sexual assault investigations, possible outcomes and the criminal court process visit our Guide for Survivors of Sexual Assault, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

Along the bottom you will see quick exit instructions. If at any time you feel you are in danger please call 911.

Have you been sexually assaulted or know someone who has been sexually assaulted?

We know you are going through a lot and we know that past experiences with police may cause you to hesitate coming forward to report.

It is important for you to know that the Toronto Police Service is here to provide assistance and support. The TPS is dedicated to ensuring that everyone impacted by sexual violence is treated with respect and dignity, fairness and honesty and in a professional and bias-free manner. We will conduct a thorough investigation while at the same time provide you with the necessary resources and information to assist you.

an illustration of an indigenous woman

Download a copy of the Guide to Sexual Assault in your language

History with Police

We have made some mistakes and we are committed to changing things for the better. We understand that there is a history of systemic barriers that affect the relationship between the Toronto Police Service and members of the LGBTQ2S+ and Indigenous communities.

The Toronto Police Service is dedicated to repairing our relationship with both of these communities. As a Police Service, we are dedicated to rooting out inequality, implementing reforms and building an inclusive culture. As we move forward, we are committed to doing the work that is necessary to rebuild and strengthen these relationships.

group of men and women holding hands and smiling

The Toronto Police Service is committed to improving the relationship between police and members of the LGBTQ2S+ and Indigenous communities. We continue to work at building trust between the Toronto Police and the LGBTQ2S+ and Indigenous communities we serve.

Sexual violence and Intimate Partner Violence perpetuated against members of the LGBTQ2S+ and Indigenous communities is under-reported. The YourChoice.to website has been expanded to include a section dedicated to serve the needs of survivors of sexual violence in the LGBTQ2S+ and Indigenous communities. The addition of this section is a vital step in supporting LGBTQ2S+ survivors of sexual violence.

The decision to report sexual violence is a very personal one. Survivors of sexual violence must make the decision that is best for them. The YourChoice.to website has been designed to give survivors the power of choice by providing access to a toolkit of resources and support services specific to the LGBTQ2S+ and Indigenous communities.

What is sexual assault?

Sexual assault is any unwanted sexual contact. Sexual assault can happen to anyone, regardless of gender, age, cultural background. It includes, but is not limited to, unwanted kissing, touching, penetration or attempted penetration. Sexaul assault can be committed by anyone; a stranger, a friend, a partner, a family member or a person in a position of authority.

What is consent?

Consent is the voluntary and active agreement, given equally by both participants, to engage in a specific sexual activity. Consent implies that a person understands what they are agreeing to, and the possible positive and negative consequences. Consent is NOT GIVEN when:

Intimate Partner Violence

Intimate Partner Violence is violence or abuse that occurs against a current or past intimate partner.

Intimate Partner Violence affects individuals of all sexual orientations and genders. Two-spirit, non-binary and trans people experience specific abuses related to their gender identity.

There are several aspects of IPV which can be unique to the LGBTQ2S+ community. “Outing” or threatening to reveal one partner’s sexual orientation/gender identity may be used as a tool of abuse in violent relationships. This may also be a barrier which reduces the likelihood of seeking help for the abuse due to the dangers associated with outing oneself and risking possible rejection from family, friends and society.

Several resources are available within the LGBTQ2S+ and Indigenous communities that will support a survivor.

Do you know someone who was sexually assaulted?

People who have been sexually assaulted need the support of their families and friends. They may feel ashamed, embarrassed, depressed and frightened. They may not want to talk about what happened. Be ready to listen when they are ready to talk. Let them know you care about them and do not judge or blame them for what happened. Be there to support them in their choices that they make during the process. They may feel guilty, but what happened is never their fault. You can be of great help by giving them this message.

Options available

As a survivor of sexual assault, we support the choices that you make with respect to the process and what is best for you.

The Toronto Police Service is here to provide assistance and support. For further information on the community supports resources available to you, sexual assault investigations, possible outcomes and the criminal court process visit our Guide for Survivors of Sexual Assault, which can be found at the top of the page.

Along the bottom you will see quick exit instructions. If at any time you feel you are in danger please call 911.

If you choose to report to the police: Process

Once dispatched to a sexual assault, the uniformed officer will:

Visit our Reporting to the Police page.

The 519

the519.org

416-392-6874

Native Women’s Resource Centre

www.nwrct.ca

416-963-9963

Egale Canada Youth Services

www.egale.ca

1-844-443-4253

Legal support

Shelters & Housing

Counselling & Support Services

Two-Spirit, Non-Binary & Trans Survivors

There are lawyers who focus on survivors of childhood sexual abuse and adult sexual assault. The purpose of obtaining a Civil Sexual Assault Lawyer is for financial compensation. You can sue the offender and you can sue an institution if on was involved.

The Toronto Police Service is unable to recommend a specific lawyer. If you would like to contact a lawyer, you can refer to any of the resources listed on this site. If the accused is found not guilty in the criminal process, you can still proceed with a civil lawyer financial compensation.

The Law Society of Upper Canada
The Lawyer Referral Service
416-947-3330
1-800-268-8326 (toll free)
www.lsuc.on.ca

There are shelters and housing options that are available and cater to the needs of the indigenous community.

Trust, understanding and awareness of needs are important factors when approaching counselling services. There exists resources that cater to the needs of different communities.

Medical & Healing Suport

Anishawabe Health Toronto logo

Anishnawbe Health Services

Our mission is to improve the health and well being of Aboriginal People in spirit, mind, emotion and body through both Traditional and Western healing approaches.

Native Women's Resource Centre logo

Native Women’s Resource Centre

The Community Wellness program works to provide family violence services, referrals, support and case management to clients to address/respond to existing and emerging health, healing and wellness issues, or violent situations. The priority focus is related to reducing family violence.

Women's College Hospital logo
Women's college hospital

The Gathering Place provides a dedicated area for Indigenous learners, staff, faculty, community members and partners from across organizations to safely access traditional medicines, exercise Indigenous ceremonial practice rights and to engage with Elders, Knowledge Keepers, Traditional Practitioners and Educators.

Contact Us

Sex Crimes
40 College Street
Toronto, ON M5G 2J3
Phone: 416-808-7474
Fax: 416-808-7472
Website

Partner Organizations

Rotman University of Toronto Crest
Victim Services Toronto logo
Egale Canada logo

Download a copy of the Guide to Sexual Assault in your language

This Project has been made possible by a grant from the Government of Ontario

For the purpose of this website, the Toronto Police Service has used “survivor” as an umbrella term to refer to anyone who has been sexually assaulted. However, we support a person’s right to choose how they wish to be identified. It is also important to note, this is not legal advice. Every effort is made to provide precise information, however your rights and a police officer’s responsibilities depend on the situation. If, at any time, you're unsure of your rights you can ask the police officer. They are required to tell you. The Toronto Police Service bears no responsibility for information on other websites. While we strive to maintain accurate and survivor-focused resources, it cannot be guaranteed. This project has been made possible by a grant from the Government of Ontario.